Jorge Daniel Taillant es fundador de CEDHA y dirige su trabajo en glaciares y minería

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November 30, 2016. Bogotá Colombia

Over 100 people from across Latin America, including public officials, brick producers and technical experts on brick production gathered for a 4-day event in Bogotá, Colombia to discuss environmental impacts from traditional brick production in the context of their climate change strategies to reduce toxic emissions such as black carbon, CO2 and other climate contaminants.

The workshop was a joint initiative of the United Nation’s Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), the Colombian Government, the Environmental Business Chamber of Colombia (CAEM), Swisscontact (a Swiss-based NGO) and the US-based Center for Human Rights and Environment (CHRE).

The occasion marked the second regional conference of the Policy Advisory Network for Latin America on Clean Brick Production (PANLAC), coordinated by the Florida-based environmental policy organization, the Center for Human Rights and Environment.

Public officials from Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia, Peru, Paraguay, Chile and Argentina were able to share strategies across the region to reduce black carbon emissions, a key climate pollutant in addition to CO2, which not only contribute to climate change, but which is also a toxic pollutant directly related to health impacts for local communities living near brick kilns, and for brick manufacturing workers. The four-day event included a site visit to Colombia’s Cundinamarca region to visit traditional brick kilns who are currently implementing innovative technologies to reduce carbon emissions and other pollutants. Officials witnessed techniques of improved oven-design, heat capture and efficiency schemes, and other technical improvements to brick production that directly reduce climate change causing contamination.

Link to workshop report: 


For more information:
J. Daniel Taillant
Center for Human Rights and Environment (CHRE)
+1 415 713 2309